Putting the Slime on Ghostbusters iOS, A Review

Putting the Slime on Ghostbusters iOS, A Review

Beeline Interactive’s Ghostbusters is one game that should have gone back to the drawing board. Not only are there a few bugs in the release but also the game play is not all that inspiring. At least the story this game tries to introduce is interesting. The game begins after Peter Venkman’s episode of torturing an innocent geek and flirting with a gorgeous gal before Ray Stanz interrupted.

After a lengthy tutorial and introduction, some long-time fans of the franchise may recall similarities with Activision’s Ghostbusters for the Commodore 64. Although players do not race around the city catching stray ghosts with the Ecto-1, the game play involves stunning ghosts with proton guns and waiting for enough ghosts to amass before dealing with the coming of Gozer.

In this new game, the player is essentially navigating a new generation of Ghostbusters around New York trying to catch ghosts, research them, earn money and make it to a haunted building to deal with some new terrible force. The original team is present in the game, but to play them early on means spending real world dollars in order to activate them early on in the game.

Despite a nice colourful update to a product that’s well past its prime—the third movie is most likely not going to happen—the only reason mobile users may want to look at this product is to see where this game’s story goes. To give an unsuspecting character (played by Steven Tash in the film) a role in the Ghostbusters universe is a nice touch.

But in order to see where this plot goes, many hours of game-time will have to be spent on a device that the game will not crash on. Also, a sizable investment of real money will have to be spent to buy “power cores,” this game’s pay-for model to quickly obtain upgrades.

Without them, to advance further in this game will require tons of patience and waiting until the in-game clock tells players that the next day has arrived. After enough missions are accomplished, perhaps more cores can be obtained, but with a game that needs fixing so it can operate on older iOS devices, to get there is going to be difficult.

This game is meant for the Apple tablet line than the iPhone/Touch miniscreen. Unless a ghost is in the machine, the game kept on crashing after the second day of game play/testing on a fourth generation iPod Touch. On the first day, the game operated fine.

Even then, this product is still wrought with user interface problems. The four characters that the player has to control should not remain motionless, waiting for an attacker to make its move. The player characters can stay where they are, but eventually, the ghosts will swarm around the target and slime him. Most of the game relies on managing a crowded chessboard to attack or defend against these entities.

Free games are better when lunch money does not have to be spent obtaining extra condiments to enhance the product. This game is nearly impossible to continue without some kind of extra investment. For players needing their paranormal fix, perhaps going back to a different product, namely XMG Studio’s Ghostbusters: Paranormal Blast, is going to be required.

Score: 1.5 out of 5

March Update: Beeline Interactive has released another update finally making the game playable. The latest introduces the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man as a new villain that has to be defeated multiple times.


Article from Gamersyndrome.com

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About the Author

avatar I'm a freelance videographer and published entertainment journalist (Absolute Underground Magazine, NerdTitan.com and 28DLA.com) with a wide range of interests. From archaeology, popular culture, video games, movies, technology and paranormal studies, there's no stone unturned. Digging for the past and embracing the Future is my mantra. These days, I'm reviewing the local food scene at Two Hungry Blokes and examining pop culture at large at Otaku no Culture. Come check it out!